Academic Courses

Last Updated: 10/6/2020 6:07 PM

Academic Course Offerings (Click to Download)

PARKWAY WEST CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY CENTER

ACADEMIC COURSE OFFERINGS

CHEMICAL PROPERTIES IN PRACTICE: This course focuses on chemistry and its applications to today’s issues. Students will first become acquainted with the basic principles of chemistry, including matter and its states, the atomic theory and thermodynamic theory, reactions, solutions and equilibrium. They will gain an understanding of the relationship between this content and nuclear and organic issues facing today’s technology. Finally, they will use this knowledge to explore many of the ways chemistry is used to balance the needs and wants of humanity with the stresses placed on the physical environment with an eye towards the application of green technology and providing the energy needed for a population becoming more technological each day. The major focus is placed on: content, analysis, interpretation and problem solving of today’s issues.

PRINCIPLES OF TECHNOLOGY: This course is an applied physics course which focuses on both content and application through the use of labs. The materials covered include measurement, Newton’s Three Laws of Motion and their application through 1 and 2 dimensions, force, momentum, and inertia, work, energy, and simple machines. This section is explored through both linear and rotational examples and labs. Thermodynamics, heat and states of matter are explored as forces which utilize pressure and have applications in real world careers. Electricity and magnetism are explained as part of the physics of the atom. Pendulums, sound and light are a part of the periodic motion and waves section. Quantum mechanics and relativity are referred to when they apply to the sections being studied. The major focus is placed on content, analysis and the utilization of that content in real world situations with an emphasis on the value of scientific application in problem solving.

US HISTORY I: This course is the study of the social, political, cultural and economic development of the United States from Pre-Colonial America through the antebellum period. Students will develop an understanding of how our Nation’s past impacts current events. Additionally, students will understand the development of our democratic principles and recognize the responsibilities of citizenship in a free nation. Students will use various resources to examine course content. In addition to the text, students will examine historical documents, eye witness accounts, excerpts of period literature and political cartoons. Students will interpret charts, graphs and maps in the context of the course.

US HISTORY II: This course continues the study of social, political, cultural and economic development of the United States from the American Civil War to the present. Students will develop an understanding of how our Nation’s past comes to impact current events. Additionally, students will understand the development of our democratic principles and recognize the responsibilities of citizenship in a free nation. Students will use various resources to examine the course content. In addition to text, students will examine historical documents, eye witness accounts, excerpts of period literature and political cartoons. Students will interpret charts, graphs and maps in the context of this course.

CIVICS: This course will provide students with a basic understanding of how the government of the United States works. Students will explain the influences that British political traditions and our experiences in early colonial government played upon the development of our system of government. Students will examine the three branches of the federal government and explain how each branch checks the power of the other. Students will discuss the evolution of the Constitution of the United States , particularly the Bill of Rights and other key amendments as they apply to an ever-changing society. Students will analyze the American political system and the electoral process, with particular emphasis upon nominations, campaigns and elections for the Presidency.